Postdoctoral Research Associate in Transport

  • Join an organisation that encourages progressive thinking
  • Be valued for your exceptional knowledge and experience in Transport Data Analytics and Reliability
  • Full-time fixed-term for 1 year with possibility to extend a further year, remuneration package: $92k per annum base salary, plus leave loading and up to 17% superannuation)

 

School of Civil Engineering

Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology

Reference no. 1985/1018F


About the opportunity 

Applications are invited for the appointment of one Postdoctoral Research Associate (Level A) in the School of Civil Engineering, within the Faculty of Engineering and IT at the University of Sydney. The position will contribute to the research and leadership of the School of Civil Engineering in the newly launched Transport Engineering program.

Emergence of new technologies such as autonomous vehicles, increases in data availability and advances in data science are paving the way for exciting and unprecedented opportunities to shape the next generation of transportation systems. The successful applicant(s) will help build a new research group headed by Dr. Emily Moylan to develop data-driven, stochastic methods in transport system performance assessment to support the adoption of new technologies and understand the evolution of travel behaviour.

About you

The University values courage and creativity; openness and engagement; inclusion and diversity; and respect and integrity. As such, we see the importance in recruiting talent aligned to these values in the pursuit of research excellence. We are looking for a Postdoctoral Research Associate who:

  • Holds a PhD in civil engineering, spatial planning or related fields
  • Has published ground-breaking research in the area of transport data science or transport system performance assessment in high quality international journals
  • Possesses strong communication skills

 

About us

Since our inception 160 years ago, the University of Sydney has led to improve the world around us. We believe in education for all and that effective leadership makes lives better. These same values are reflected in our approach to diversity and inclusion, and underpin our long-term strategy for growth. We are Australia’s first university and have an outstanding global reputation for academic and research excellence. Across 9 campuses, we employ over 7600 academic and non-academic staff who support over 47,000 students.
We are undergoing significant transformative change which brings opportunity for innovation, progressive thinking, breaking with convention, challenging the status quo, and improving the world around us

 

For more information about the position, or if you require reasonable adjustment or support filling out this application, please contact Dan Kuhner, Recruitment Partner, on +61 2 8627 0934 or dan.kuhner@sydney.edu.au

 

Intending applicants are welcome to seek further information about the position from Dr Emily Moylan emily.moylan@sydney.edu.au

 

Closing date: 11:30pm 11 November 2018 

 

The University of Sydney is committed to diversity and social inclusion. Applications from people of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds; equity target groups including women, people with disabilities, people who identify as LGBTIQ; and people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent, are encouraged.

 

The University reserves the right not to proceed with any appointment.

Candidate Information Pack

Network Structure and the Journey to Work: An Intra-Metropolitan Analysis

Recently published:

Variation of estimated network measures by Minor Civil Division.

This research quantifies the variation of network structure within the Minneapolis – St. Paul metropolitan area and relates it to average travel time to work for each Minor Civil Division (MCD) in the metro area. The variation of these measures within the metropolitan area is analyzed spatially. The measures of network structure are then related to observed travel. Better connected networks have lower average travel times, all else equal. The results corroborate a relation between network structure and travel and point to the importance of understanding the underlying street network structure.

Measuring polycentricity via network flows, spatial interaction, and percolation

Recent working paper:

Polycentricity is most commonly measured by location-based metrics (e.g. employment density or total number of workers, above a threshold, used to count the number of centres). While these metrics are good indicators of location ‘centricity’, the results are sensitive to threshold-choice. We consider here the alternate idea that a centre’s status depends on which other locations it is con- nected to in terms of trip inflows and outflows: this is inherently a network rather than a location idea. A set of flow and network-based centricity metrics for measuring metropolitan area poly- centricity using Journey-To-Work (JTW) data are presented: (a) trip-based, (b) density-based, and, (c) accessibility-based. Using these measures, polycentricity is computed and rank-centricity distributions are plotted to test whether these distributions follow Zipf-like or Chirstaller-like distributions. Further, a percolation theory framework is proposed for the full origin-destination (OD) matrix, where trip flows are used as a thresholding parameter to count the number of sub-centres. It is found that trip flows prove to be an effective measure to count and hierarchically organise metropolitan area sub-centres, and provide one way of dealing with the arbitrariness of defining a threshold on numbers of employed persons, employment density, or centricities to count sub-centres. These measures demonstrated on data from the Greater Sydney region show that the trip flow-based threshold and network centricities help to characterize polycentricity more robustly than the traditional number or density-based thresholds alone and provide unexpected insights into the connections between land use, transport, and urban structure.SankeyFlowsSydney

Travel Cost and Dropout from Secondary Schools in Nepal

Recent working paper:

Distribution of one-way travel time to lower secondary and secondary public schools in Nepal. Children enrolled vs. children dropped out.
Distribution of one-way travel time to lower secondary and secondary public schools in Nepal. Children enrolled vs. children dropped out.

The study relates the association between travel time to the lower secondary and secondary public schools of Nepal and the dropout grade before leaving secondary school using an ordered logit model. It is shown that as the travel time to the school increases, students are more likely to dropout from the school system in earlier grades. The results from this study will be useful to policymakers, especially from developing countries, as it places transport in the context of education.

Migrations: Where are they now

Congratulations to Nexus group alumni on their relatively new positions:

The Transportist: October 2018

Welcome to the October 2018 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

Transport Findings

“If I had more time I would have written a shorter letter.”

Transport Findings is an interdisciplinary, open access journal focused on short, clear, and pointed research results. Follow on Twitter or RSS. Let me know if you are interested in participating (as an author or editor/reviewer).

Posts

Conferences

Books

News

Macromobility:

Transit

Automated, Autonomous, Driverless, and Self-Driving Vehicles, and Semi-Autonomous Systems 

Electric Vehicles [and Renewable Energy]

Human-Driven Vehicles, Signs, Signals, Sensors, and Markings, and Roads

Mesomobility:

Shared Vehicles/Ride-sharing/Ride-hailing/Taxis/Car Sharing

Micromobility:

Human-Powered Vehicles/Bikes/Pedestrians/Scooters/eBikes/Last-Mile/First-Mile/etc

[EVERYONE, NOTE, Bikeshare was around for years before the first and only Divvy bike fatality in 2016 and the first and only Citibike fatality in 2017 (I can only find 2 US bikesharing deaths to date in over a decade of use, Scooters had 2 last week). The danger levels of bikesharing is nothing compared to scooters under current designs, usage patterns, and poor infrastructure.]

Land Use/Architecture

Justice/Equity

 Kerbs and Sidewalks

Retail, Freight, Waste, and Logistics

Technology History

Environment

Research & Data

Working Papers by Us

by Others

Scientific Methods

Other People’s Newsletters

Read the Transportist, but don’t just read the Transportist, also read:

Books

Optimum Stop Spacing for Accessibility

Relationship between Dwell Time, Stop Spacing, and Accessibility

Recent working paper:

This paper describes the connection between stop spacing and person-weighted accessibility for a transit route. Population distribution is assumed to be uniform along the line, but at each station, demand drops with distance from the station. The study reveals that neither short nor excessive stop spacings are efficient in providing accessibility. For the configuration of each transit route, an optimum stop spacing exists that maximizes accessibility. Parameters including transit vehicle acceleration, deceleration, top speed, dwell time, and pedestrian walking speed affect level of accessibility achiev- able, and differ in their effect on accessibility results. The findings provide an anchor of reference both for the planning of future transit systems, and for transit operators to make operational changes to system design parameters that improve accessibility in a cost-effective manner. The study technically justifies the “rule of thumb” in setting different stop spacings for metro, streetcars, and other different transit services. Different types of transit vary in their ability to provide accessibility, slower moving streetcar (tram) type urban rails are inherently disadvantaged in that respect. Thus the type of transit service to be built should be of particular concern, if the transit is to effectively serve its intended population.

Walking and Talking: The Effect of Smartphone Use and Group Conversation on Pedestrian Speed.

Camera Layout, Broadway study site

Recent working paper:

By testing the walking speed of groups of pedestrians and of phone users, followers of groups and of phone users, and of people uninfluenced by phone users and groups, from different sites it could been seen that groups of people and phone users, and often followers of phone users, walk significantly slower than people uninfluenced by phone. In a narrow path people in groups and phone users not only slow themselves down but also slow the people behind. The rise of the smartphone correlates with a reduction in walking speed.

Dockless in Sydney: The Rise and Decline of Bikesharing in Australia.

Recent working paper:

Percentage of static bikes in Pyrmont by company and day (Bikes unmoved for 48h or more)

In mid-2017, dockless, (or stationless) bikesharing appeared on the streets of Sydney. The birth of dockless bikesharing, its evolution as well as its consequences, and use habits are studied with review of policies and field investigations. It is found that bicycle use in Sydney is less than hoped for, vandalism is high, regulations unfavourable, and thus, the conditions for successful bikesharing are not met.