The Transportist: September 2018

Welcome to the September 2018 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

Posts

Conferences

  • Save the date for the World Symposium on Transportation & Land Use Research in Portland, OR July 13-15, 2020

Jobs

News

Automated, Autonomous, Driverless, and Self-Driving Vehicles, and Semi-Autonomous Systems 

Shared Vehicles/Ride-sharing/Ride-hailing/Taxis/Car Sharing

Electric Vehicles [and Renewable Energy]

Human Powered Vehicles/Bikes/Pedestrians/Scooters/eBikes/etc

Human Driven Vehicles, Signs, Signals, Sensors, and Markings, and Roads

Transit

Land Use/Architecture

Justice/Equity

Kerbs and Sidewalks

Retail, Freight, Waste, and Logistics

Technology History

Education

Isochrones and Maps

Aviation

Fantasy

 

Research & Data

by Us

by Others

Books

Elements of Access: Transport Planning for Engineers, Transport Engineering for Planners. By David M. Levinson, Wes Marshall, Kay Axhausen.

The Transportist: August 2018

Welcome to the August 2018 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

Talks

  • I am giving a talk August 09 The Street: Design for People by Foreground, talking about the Footpath of the Future. This is at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney. Tickets here.

Posts

 

Jobs

New Books

News

Automated, Autonomous, Driverless, and Self-Driving Vehicles, and Semi-Autonomous Systems 

Shared Vehicles/Ride-sharing/Ride-hailing/Taxis/Car Sharing

Electric Vehicles [and Renewable Energy]

Human Powered Vehicles/Bikes/Pedestrians/Scooters/eBikes/etc

Human Driven Vehicles, Signs, Signals, Sensors, and Markings, and Roads

Transit

Land Use/Architecture

Justice/Equity

Kerbs and Sidewalks

Retail, Freight, Waste, and Logistics

Technology History

Research & Data

by Us

by Others

Books

Transportist: July 2018

Welcome to the July 2018 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

Posts

 

Jobs

  • Post-Doc: Transportation Justice / Transportation Planning / Emerging Technologies – University of Toronto
  • The Urban Transportation Center (UTC) at the University of Illinois at Chicago is seeking to hire a postdoc with excellent communication skills to work on transportation policy issues, transit planning and performance measures, and mobility solutions including autonomous/connected vehicles.  Requirements include a doctorate in civil engineering, urban planning or public policy. The selected candidate will also be required to work with graduate research assistants and assist the UTC director in pursuing external grant opportunities. The appointment will begin in the Fall of 2018. There will be no teaching requirement. Interested candidates should send a letter of interest and CV to the attention of Dr. Kazuya Kawamura at kazuya@uic.edu with the subject line “UTC postdoc”.
  • Product Manager @ Coord 

 

Contests and Scholarships

  • Lendlease Bradfield Urbanisation Scholarship: ($10000) Are you a 1st or 2nd year student with a big vision for Sydney?
  • Calling all “outside the box” thinkers! Do you have the next brilliant idea to help solve or improve a current transportation policy or system management challenge? Submit a 2,000 word proposal, PowerPoint presentation, video or other media form outlining your creative ideas — and you could win $10,000! Visit http://outsidethebox.gmu.edu/ for submission guidelines.

 

Calls

  • ADD30 the TRB standing committee on transport and Land Development, together with WSTLUR, has issued a call for papers for next TRB meeting titled – Accessibility for Policy and Practice. More details could be seen in this link  https://annualmeeting.mytrb.org/CallForPapers/Details/634

 

News

Automated, Autonomous, Driverless, and Self-Driving Vehicles, and Semi-Autonomous Systems

 

Shared Vehicles/Ride-sharing/Ride-hailing/Taxis/Car Sharing

Electric Vehicles [and Renewable Energy]

Human Powered Vehicles/Bikes/Pedestrians/Scooters/eBikes/etc

Human Driven Vehicles, Signs, Signals, Sensors, and Markings, and Roads

Transit

Ferries/Ports/Maritime/Canals

 

Land Use

Justice/Equity

Fantasy

Kerbs and Sidewalks

Retail, Freight, and Logistics

Technology

Technology History

Research & Data

Books

 

The Transportist: April 2018

Welcome to the April 2018 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

Thank you to all who purchased Elements of Access and Metropolitan Transport and Land Use in recent months. Copies are still available.

Transportist Posts

Transport News

​Uber’s AV Killed Someone

I’m beginning to think Uber gives capitalism a bad name.

(in reverse chronological order, oldest at bottom)

AVs

SVs/Taxis/Car Sharing

EVs

HPVs/Bikes/Pedestrians

Roads

Aviation

Transit

Ferries

Intercity Rail

Land Use

Science

Economics

Justice/Equity

Security

Research & Data

Books

Now available:

Nothing in cities makes sense except in the light of accessibility. Transport cannot be understood without reference to the location of activities (land use), and vice versa. To understand one requires understanding the other. However, for a variety of historical reasons, transport and land use are quite divorced in practice. Typical transport engineers only touch land use planning courses once at most, and only then if they attend graduate school. Land use planners understand transport the way everyone does, from the perspective of the traveler, not of the system, and are seldom exposed to transport aside from, at best, a lone course in graduate school. This text aims to bridge the chasm, helping engineers understand the elements of access that are associated not only with traffic, but also with human behavior and activity location, and helping planners understand the technology underlying transport engineering, the processes, equations, and logic that make up the transport half of the accessibility measure. It aims to help both communicate accessibility to the public.

Purchase:

Still available …
In this book we propose the welcome notion that traffic—as most people have come to know it—is ending and why. We depict a transport context in most communities where new opportunities are created by the collision of slow, medium, and fast moving technologies. We then unfold a framework to think more broadly about concepts of transport and accessibility. In this framework, transport systems are being augmented with a range of information technologies; it invokes fresh flows of goods and information. We discuss large scale trends that are revolutionizing the transport landscape: electrification, automation, the sharing economy, and big data. Based on all of this, the final chapters offer strategies to shape the future of infrastructure needs and priorities.
Purchase

As cities around the globe respond to rapid technological changes and political pressures, coordinated transport and land use planning is an often targeted aim.
Metropolitan Transport and Land Use, the second edition of Planning for Place and Plexus, provides unique and updated perspectives on metropolitan transport networks and land use planning, challenging current planning strategies, offering frameworks to understand and evaluate policy, and suggesting alternative solutions.
The book includes current and cutting-edge theory, findings, and recommendations which are cleverly illustrated throughout using international examples. This revised work continues to serve as a valuable resource for students, researchers, practitioners, and policy advisors working across transport, land use, and planning.

PURCHASE

The Transportist: February 2018

Welcome to the February 2018 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

Thank you to all who purchased Elements of Access. Copies are still available.

Transportist Posts

Transport Jobs

 

Transport Scholarships

  • Forest Coach Line in association with the Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies are offering a Scholarship to a PhD student whose research is focused on public transport. Please see website and Research Database for further information.
  • The Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies are offering a Scholarship to a PhD student whose research is focused on public transport. Please see website and Research Database for further information.

 

Transport News

Transit

[It is a requirement to use the phrase ‘off-the-rails’ in commentary about Sydney rail issues]

Roads

AVs

Quote: I just realized that with the advent of self-driving vehicles, we may soon get country songs where your truck leaves you too. [Marko Kloos on Twitter]

EVs

SVs/Taxis/Car Sharing

HGVs/Freight/Delivery/Retail

Intercity Rail

Land Use

Science

HPVs/Bikes/Pedestrians

Ferries

Social Networks

Linguistics

 

Trade

Research

Books

Now available:

Nothing in cities makes sense except in the light of accessibility. Transport cannot be understood without reference to the location of activities (land use), and vice versa. To understand one requires understanding the other. However, for a variety of historical reasons, transport and land use are quite divorced in practice. Typical transport engineers only touch land use planning courses once at most, and only then if they attend graduate school. Land use planners understand transport the way everyone does, from the perspective of the traveler, not of the system, and are seldom exposed to transport aside from, at best, a lone course in graduate school. This text aims to bridge the chasm, helping engineers understand the elements of access that are associated not only with traffic, but also with human behavior and activity location, and helping planners understand the technology underlying transport engineering, the processes, equations, and logic that make up the transport half of the accessibility measure. It aims to help both communicate accessibility to the public.

Purchase:

Still available …
In this book we propose the welcome notion that traffic—as most people have come to know it—is ending and why. We depict a transport context in most communities where new opportunities are created by the collision of slow, medium, and fast moving technologies. We then unfold a framework to think more broadly about concepts of transport and accessibility. In this framework, transport systems are being augmented with a range of information technologies; it invokes fresh flows of goods and information. We discuss large scale trends that are revolutionizing the transport landscape: electrification, automation, the sharing economy, and big data. Based on all of this, the final chapters offer strategies to shape the future of infrastructure needs and priorities.
Purchase

The Transportist: January 2018

Welcome to the January 2018 issue of The Transportist, which I have moved to the beginning of the month. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

I hope Comrade Christmas, Hannukah Harry, or Elon Musk was good to you last year. While I hope to see many of you at TRB 2019. I will not be attending this year.

Books

Now available:

Elements of Access: Transport Planning for Engineers, Transport Engineering for Planners. By David M. Levinson, Wes Marshall, Kay Axhausen.
Elements of Access: Transport Planning for Engineers, Transport Engineering for Planners. By David M. Levinson, Wes Marshall, Kay Axhausen.

Nothing in cities makes sense except in the light of accessibility. Transport cannot be understood without reference to the location of activities (land use), and vice versa. To understand one requires understanding the other. However, for a variety of historical reasons, transport and land use are quite divorced in practice. Typical transport engineers only touch land use planning courses once at most, and only then if they attend graduate school. Land use planners understand transport the way everyone does, from the perspective of the traveler, not of the system, and are seldom exposed to transport aside from, at best, a lone course in graduate school. This text aims to bridge the chasm, helping engineers understand the elements of access that are associated not only with traffic, but also with human behavior and activity location, and helping planners understand the technology underlying transport engineering, the processes, equations, and logic that make up the transport half of the accessibility measure. It aims to help both communicate accessibility to the public.

Purchase:

 

Transportist Posts

Sydney

Transport News

Transit

Roads

AVs

 

SVs/Taxis

HGVs/Freight/Delivery

HPVs

History

Land Use

Science

 

Research

The Transportist: December 2017

Welcome to the December 2017 issue of The Transportist. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

Car vs. Stroller. I did not stage this. Apparently Sergei Eisenstein was here.
Car vs. Stroller. I did not stage this. Apparently Sergei Eisenstein was here.

 Transportist Posts

Sydney

Transport News

Transit

Roads/Cars

AVs

EVs / Energy / Environment

HPVs / Bikes

SVs / Taxis

Land Use

Fantasy (i.e. Commentary on Elon Musk’s schemes)

[Context: Elon Musk criticized transit for serial callers and subsequently called Jarrett Walker an idiot in a tweet (corrected to sanctimonious idiot). The internet reacted]

Retail / Delivery

Water, Canals

Science

Visualisation

Research

By Others

The Transportist – November 2017

Welcome to the November 2017 issue of The Transportist. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

 Transportist Posts

Sydney

Transport News

Walking

Transit

Intercity Buses

Roads/Cars

AVs

CVs

EVs / Energy / Environment

HGVs

HPVs / Bikes

SVs / Taxis

Land Use

Equity / Justice

Safety

Retail / Delivery

UAVs, Aviation and Space

Science

Culture

Visualisation

Research

The Transportist: October 2017

Welcome to the October 2017 issue of The Transportist. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

Announcements

We are pleased to announce the print publication of our latest book The End of Traffic and the Future of Access: A Roadmap to the New Transport Landscape

This is the Third Edition of The End of Traffic and the Future of Transport. It has been updated and reorganized, with new chapters on Connectivity, Demassification, Dematerialization, and Delivery, and new data where available. It is also available in a gorgeous PDF version, in addition to the updated ePub.

Table of Contents

Preface: The Lost Joy of Automobility
What Happened to Traffic?
1. Climbing Mount Auto: The Rise of Cars in the 20th Century [PREVIEW]
2. Less Traffic is a Good Thing
3. What Killed America’s Traffic?
4. Pace of Change
5. Electrification
6. Automation
7. Connectivity
8. MaaS Transport
9. Demassification
10. Dematerialization
11. Delivery
12. Transit
13. Up and Out: The Future of Travel Demand and Where We Live
14. Reduce, Reuse, (re)Cycle
15. Pricing
16. Redeeming Transport
A. The Traditional Transport Engineer
B. Traffic, What Is It?
C. Forecasting
D. Access, What Is It?
E. (Why) Is Transport Underfunded?

Jobs

 Transportist Posts

Media Appearances

Transport News

Transit

Roads

AVs

CVs

EVs / Energy / Environment

HPVs / Bikes

SVs / Taxis

Canals/Shipping/Maritime/Ferries

Land Use

Equity / Justice

Safety

Fantasy

Retail / Delivery

UAVs, Aviation and Space

Trains

Science

Culture