Transportist: June 2019

Welcome to the June 2019 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers.  As always you can follow along at the  transportist.org or on Twitter.

designing the 30-minute city

I briefly made an incursion upon the USA, and gave the 12th Annual Wachs Lecture, designing the 30-minute city, available on YouTube. (Note: There are some sound issues for the first few minutes, but those get resolved quickly.)

The Conversation

Transportist (the blog)

WalkSydney

Transport Findings

Professoring

Papers by Us

by Others

Research

  • Survey for Uber Pick-up Times (A PhD student is trying to determine the actual distribution of schedule delay for Uber pickups, you can help expand human knowledge by sharing your data. It will not be used for nefarious purposes.)

Revived Open Access Journals

News

Books

The Transportist: May 2019

Welcome to the May 2019 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. We are testing a new newsletter platform, Substack. If you received this by email, you have been migrated, and no action is required on your part. As always you can follow along at the  transportist.org or on Twitter.

Laws

Like Newton in Mechanics or Tobler in Geography, we ought to have laws in transport. I posit the following:

  • Law 1: Everyone complains about transport, independent of the quality of travel experienced.
  • Law 2: Everyone is a transport expert.

Transportist(the blog)

Foreground

WalkSydney

News

Professoring

Papers by Us

Books by Others

Books

Transportist: March 2019

Welcome to the March 2019 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the  transportist.org or on Twitter.

February was notable for the launch of Transport Findings and our hosting the first TransportCamp in Sydney, both sponsored by TransportLab.

TransportFindings

We are pleased to announce the launch of Transport Findings, a new, independent, community-led, peer-reviewed, open-access journal focused on short, clear, and pointed research results. We welcome submissions.

Follow the journal on Twitter. Visit the journal.

The launch includes the following articles:

 

TransportCamp

  • TransportCamp, an unconference, was held on the University of Sydney campus. TransportLab was pleased to host and sponsor. We expect to host another one next year

WalkSydney

News

Macromobility:

Transit and Microtransit

Automated, Autonomous, Driverless, and Self-Driving Vehicles, and Semi-Autonomous Systems 

Human-Driven Vehicles, Signs, Signals, Sensors, and Markings, and Roads

Mesomobility:

Shared Vehicles/Ride-sharing/Ride-hailing/Taxis/Car Sharing

Micromobility:

Human-Powered Vehicles/Bikes/Pedestrians/Scooters/eBikes/Last-Mile/First-Mile/Last-Meter/First-Meter/etc.

Electrification

Land Use

Retail, Wholesale, Logistics, Supply Chain

Freight

Intercity Trains A lot of news this month about the inevitable scaling-back/delay/deferral/cancellation of America’s favorite Norwegian Parrot, the California High-speed Rail project

Maps

Equity and Justice

Behavior

Professoring

Papers by Us

  • Pavement condition and crashes
    David Levinson, Toshihiro Yokoo, Mihai Marasteanu
    Poor roads generally increase property damage and injury crashes. But on curves, good pavement quality increases fatal, injury, and property-damage crashes.

Papers by Others

 

Books

Transportist: February 2019

Welcome to the February 2019 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the  blog or on Twitter.

I spent much of the last month in the Northern Hemisphere, visiting the relos in California, Arizona, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, as well as attending the Transportation Research Board conference and seeing many old friends and colleagues. We presented a bunch of papers. Let me know if you want copies.

TransportLab

  • We are pleased to launch TransportLab, a new interdisciplinary research group at the University of Sydney, aimed at finding solutions to transport problems, independent of domain.Members of the group come from the Faculties of Architecture, Design, and Planning (Somwrita Sarkar and Jennifer Kent) and Engineering (David Levinson, Mohsen Ramezani, Emily Moylan, and Mengying Cui). Our research themes are: AccessConnectControlDesignRelySustain.Current question we are researching include:
  • System Impacts of Autonomous Vehicles
  • Transport and Land Use Interactions
  • Transport System Performance Measures
  • Traffic Operations and Control
  • Network and Spatial Inequalities

Let us know if you want to collaborate on or sponsor research.

Follow us on Twitter @TransLab_Sydney. Subscribe to our Newsletter. Visit the website.

Conferences

WalkSydney

Jobs

Posts at the Blog

News

Macromobility:

Transit and Microtransit

Automated, Autonomous, Driverless, and Self-Driving Vehicles, and Semi-Autonomous Systems 

Human-Driven Vehicles, Signs, Signals, Sensors, and Markings, and Roads

Mesomobility:

Shared Vehicles/Ride-sharing/Ride-hailing/Taxis/Car Sharing

Micromobility:

Human-Powered Vehicles/Bikes/Pedestrians/Scooters/eBikes/Last-Mile/First-Mile/Last-Meter/First-Meter/etc.

Electrification

Kerbs and Curbs

Land Use

Intercity Trains

Aviation and Space

Infrastructure

Equity and Justice

Funding and Finance and Governance

Climate

History

Behavior

Fantasy

Media

Professoring

Publishing

Research & Data

Papers by Us

  • Huang, Jie, David Levinson, Jiaoe Wang, Haitao Jin (2019) Job-worker spatial dynamics in Beijing: Insights from Smart Card Data. Cities 86 89-93 [doi]

Papers by Others

Books

Transportist: January 2019

Welcome to the January 2019 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the  blog or on Twitter.

Jobs

Posts at the Blog

Posts at WalkSydney

If you care about walking in Sydney, and want to get involved, go here.

Conferences

News

Macromobility:

Transit

Automated, Autonomous, Driverless, and Self-Driving Vehicles, and Semi-Autonomous Systems 

Waymo
Tesla

Neither Tesla, Nor Waymo   

Human-Driven Vehicles, Signs, Signals, Sensors, and Markings, and Roads

Mesomobility:

Shared Vehicles/Ride-sharing/Ride-hailing/Taxis/Car Sharing

Micromobility:

Human-Powered Vehicles/Bikes/Pedestrians/Scooters/eBikes/Last-Mile/First-Mile/Last-Meter/First-Meter/etc.

 

Curbs and Kerbs

 

Land Use

Intercity Trains

Aviation and Space

Funding and Finance and Governance

Science

Fantasy

Professoring

Publishing

Research & Data

Papers by Us

 

Books by Others

New organisations

Books

Transportist: December 2018

Welcome to the December 2018 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the  blog or on Twitter

Jobs

WalkSydney

We launched WalkSydney.org this month. It’s a local organisation aimed at promoting walking. I have put up several posts on the site (others have as well). While the details are Sydney-based, the logic is sadly universal. If you want to make Sydney a better place to walk (scoot, stride, perambulate, and so on), you should join. We are bike-friendly, unlike some other Australian pedestrian ‘advocacy’ groups. You can follow on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram as well.

Posts

News

Macromobility:

Transit

Automated, Autonomous, Driverless, and Self-Driving Vehicles, and Semi-Autonomous Systems 

Electric Vehicles [and Renewable Energy]

Human-Driven Vehicles, Signs, Signals, Sensors, and Markings, and Roads

Mesomobility:

Shared Vehicles/Ride-sharing/Ride-hailing/Taxis/Car Sharing

Micromobility:

Human-Powered Vehicles/Bikes/Pedestrians/Scooters/eBikes/Last-Mile/First-Mile/etc

Technology History

Intercity Trains

Aviation and Space

Maritime and Ferries

Research & Data

Papers by Us

  • Jie HuangDavid LevinsonJiaoe WangJiangping Zhou, and Zi-jia Wang (2018) Tracking job and housing dynamics with smartcard data. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  (Open Access)
Residential locations, the jobs–housing relationship, and commuting patterns are key elements to understand urban spatial structure and how city dwellers live. Their successive interaction is important for various fields including urban planning, transport, intraurban migration studies, and social science. However, understanding of the long-term trajectories of workplace and home location, and the resulting commuting patterns, is still limited due to lack of year-to-year data tracking individual behavior. With a 7-y transit smartcard dataset, this paper traces individual trajectories of residences and workplaces. Based on in-metro travel times before and after job and/or home moves, we find that 45 min is an inflection point where the behavioral preference changes. Commuters whose travel time exceeds the point prefer to shorten commutes via moves, while others with shorter commutes tend to increase travel time for better jobs and/or residences. Moreover, we capture four mobility groups: home mover, job hopper, job-and-residence switcher, and stayer. This paper studies how these groups trade off travel time and housing expenditure with their job and housing patterns. Stayers with high job and housing stability tend to be home (apartment unit) owners subject to middle- to high-income groups. Home movers work at places similar to stayers, while they may upgrade from tenancy to ownership. Switchers increase commute time as well as housing expenditure via job and home moves, as they pay for better residences and work farther from home. Job hoppers mainly reside in the suburbs, suffer from long commutes, change jobs frequently, and are likely to be low-income migrants.

 

by Others

Books

The Transportist: November 2018

Welcome to the November 2018 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the  blog or on Twitter

Jobs

Posts

Books

News

Macromobility:

Transit 

Automated, Autonomous, Driverless, and Self-Driving Vehicles, and Semi-Autonomous Systems 

Electric Vehicles [and Renewable Energy]

Human-Driven Vehicles, Signs, Signals, Sensors, and Markings, and Roads

Mesomobility:

Shared Vehicles/Ride-sharing/Ride-hailing/Taxis/Car Sharing

Micromobility: 

Human-Powered Vehicles/Bikes/Pedestrians/Scooters/eBikes/Last-Mile/First-Mile/etc

Land Use/Architecture

Kerbs and Sidewalks

Retail, Freight, Waste, and Logistics

Technology History

Travel Behaviour

Intercity Trains

Aviation and Space

Maritime

Professoring

Fantasy

Research & Data

Papers by Us

 

by Others

Journals

Researchers

Other People’s Newsletters

Read the Transportist, but don’t just read the Transportist, also read:

Books

The Transportist: October 2018

Welcome to the October 2018 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

Transport Findings

“If I had more time I would have written a shorter letter.”

Transport Findings is an interdisciplinary, open access journal focused on short, clear, and pointed research results. Follow on Twitter or RSS. Let me know if you are interested in participating (as an author or editor/reviewer).

Posts

Conferences

Books

News

Macromobility:

Transit

Automated, Autonomous, Driverless, and Self-Driving Vehicles, and Semi-Autonomous Systems 

Electric Vehicles [and Renewable Energy]

Human-Driven Vehicles, Signs, Signals, Sensors, and Markings, and Roads

Mesomobility:

Shared Vehicles/Ride-sharing/Ride-hailing/Taxis/Car Sharing

Micromobility:

Human-Powered Vehicles/Bikes/Pedestrians/Scooters/eBikes/Last-Mile/First-Mile/etc

[EVERYONE, NOTE, Bikeshare was around for years before the first and only Divvy bike fatality in 2016 and the first and only Citibike fatality in 2017 (I can only find 2 US bikesharing deaths to date in over a decade of use, Scooters had 2 last week). The danger levels of bikesharing is nothing compared to scooters under current designs, usage patterns, and poor infrastructure.]

Land Use/Architecture

Justice/Equity

 Kerbs and Sidewalks

Retail, Freight, Waste, and Logistics

Technology History

Environment

Research & Data

Working Papers by Us

by Others

Scientific Methods

Other People’s Newsletters

Read the Transportist, but don’t just read the Transportist, also read:

Books

The Transportist: September 2018

Welcome to the September 2018 issue of The Transportist, especially to our new readers. As always you can follow along at the blog or on Twitter.

Posts

Conferences

  • Save the date for the World Symposium on Transportation & Land Use Research in Portland, OR July 13-15, 2020

Jobs

News

Automated, Autonomous, Driverless, and Self-Driving Vehicles, and Semi-Autonomous Systems 

Shared Vehicles/Ride-sharing/Ride-hailing/Taxis/Car Sharing

Electric Vehicles [and Renewable Energy]

Human Powered Vehicles/Bikes/Pedestrians/Scooters/eBikes/etc

Human Driven Vehicles, Signs, Signals, Sensors, and Markings, and Roads

Transit

Land Use/Architecture

Justice/Equity

Kerbs and Sidewalks

Retail, Freight, Waste, and Logistics

Technology History

Education

Isochrones and Maps

Aviation

Fantasy

 

Research & Data

by Us

by Others

Books

Elements of Access: Transport Planning for Engineers, Transport Engineering for Planners. By David M. Levinson, Wes Marshall, Kay Axhausen.