HOT Lanes in the United States | The End of Traffic and the Future of Transport

The onset of High Occupancy/Toll (HOT) or express lanes is already happening across the US (Figure 13.1). Whereas road pricing requires everyone to pay for use of the facility, HOT lanes allow users to opt into paying a toll in exchange for assurance of uncongested travel (or travel for free or a discount if they are in a carpool). We foresee more HOT lane networks running adjacent to most urban freeways in the US, shaving some time off for those who chose to pay. HOT Lanes are compatible with road pricing systems that do not entirely eliminate congestion, as they provide higher reliability (just as FedEx offers alternative rates for same-day, overnight, and two-day delivery). HOT Lanes will also be important because they are likely to be the first roads to be entirely automated. Given their isolation from other lanes and the premium price, they can be automated much sooner than other roads, which will continue to serve mixed human and automated traffic for at least another decade past the onset of select lanes for automated cars. From Levinson and Krizek (2015) The End of Traffic and the Future of Transport. http://davidlevinson.org/the-end-of-traffic-and-the-future-of-transport/ Figure 13.1, Sources various. Special thanks to David Ungemah and Mark Burris.
The onset of High Occupancy/Toll (HOT) or express lanes is already happening across the US (Figure 13.1). Whereas road pricing requires everyone to pay for use of the facility, HOT lanes allow users to opt into paying a toll in exchange for assurance of uncongested travel (or travel for free or a discount if they are in a carpool). We foresee more HOT lane networks running adjacent to most urban freeways in the US, shaving some time off for those who chose to pay. HOT Lanes are compatible with road pricing systems that do not entirely eliminate congestion, as they provide higher reliability (just as FedEx offers alternative rates for same-day, overnight, and two-day delivery).
HOT Lanes will also be important because they are likely to be the first roads to be entirely automated. Given their isolation from other lanes and the premium price, they can be automated much sooner than other roads, which will continue to serve mixed human and automated traffic for at least another decade past the onset of select lanes for automated cars.
From Levinson and Krizek (2015) The End of Traffic and the Future of Transport. 
Figure 13.1, Sources various. Special thanks to David Ungemah and Mark Burris.

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