Metro Transit adding information at bus stops – Signs that now simply say “Bus stop” will be replaced for ones with route numbers and other information.

Eric Roper writes in the StarTribune: Metro Transit adding information at bus stops Signs that now simply say “Bus stop” will be replaced for ones with route numbers and other information. 

I am very happy about this. I have talked about bus stops a lot on this blog, they are the first step in First Class transit, but by no means the last. While this isn’t quite everything I (or you should) want, it is more than we have. Upon full deployment, (and assuming they are maintained) it is probably enough to claim victory on the signage front and move on.

“It’s especially important in converting nonusers into users,” said University of Minnesota Prof. David Levinson, a transportation expert who has criticized Metro Transit’s signage. “It’s providing basic information to people who might not even know how transit works and where transit would go.”

Levinson said the agency’s next priority should be improving bus speed and frequency by expanding urban rapid bus service, the first example of which will go into service on Snelling Avenue next year, to all-important bus routes in Minneapolis and St. Paul. At a cost of about $27 million, the A Line is expected to increase bus speed dramatically through preboarding payment, wider stop spacing and traffic signal priority. Stops will also feature real-time arrival information and other amenities.

“I don’t want to say it’s cheap to do this, because there’s obviously some cost to doing this, but it’s a much more cost-effective investment than Southwest LRT, for instance,” Levinson said.

My evidence for the last claim is the data in this post: Cost per Daily Passenger Mile, which is still approximately correct.

Climbing Mount Auto | The End of Traffic and the Future of Transport

Quarterly figures reveal that vehicle travel per person dipped for most of the 2000s and the early 2010s (total vehicle travel has dipped too, but not as severely owing to population gains). Per-capita vehicle travel is roughly where it was in the late 1990s. And vehicle miles traveled, the number of miles that cars are moving is moving mostly sideways, only surpassing the 2007 peak in 2014. Context helps put the significance in perspective. These trends are following 90 years of steady, almost uniform increases in the amount of automobile traffic. Barring a few exceptions owing to economic downturns or energy shocks, vehicle miles traveled increased almost every year in the US for the entire twentieth century!  From Levinson and Krizek (2015) The End of Traffic and the Future of Transport.    Figure 1.1. Note: The graph shows both linked and unlinked transit trips, as the way transit trips are counted has changed, and there is no continuous series of both over the entire period.  Source: US Census Statistical Abstract http://www.census.gov/prod/2/gen/96statab/app4.pdf and US Federal Highway Administration: Highway Statistics http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policyinformation/statistics/2012/vmt422c.cfm
Quarterly figures reveal that vehicle travel per person dipped for most of the 2000s and the early 2010s (total vehicle travel has dipped too, but not as severely owing to population gains). Per-capita vehicle travel is roughly where it was in the late 1990s. And vehicle miles traveled, the number of miles that cars are moving is moving mostly sideways, only surpassing the 2007 peak in 2014. Context helps put the significance in perspective. These trends are following 90 years of steady, almost uniform increases in the amount of automobile traffic. Barring a few exceptions owing to economic downturns or energy shocks, vehicle miles traveled increased almost every year in the US for the entire twentieth century!
From Levinson and Krizek (2015) The End of Traffic and the Future of Transport.
Figure 1.1. Note: The graph shows both linked and unlinked transit trips, as the way transit trips are counted has changed, and there is no continuous series of both over the entire period. Source: US Census Statistical Abstract and US Federal Highway Administration: Highway Statistics