Flipping Signals

Shibuya, Japan (from wikimedia commons)

In places that are, or want to be, walkable, and serve pedestrian traffic, traffic signals should have a default setting of pedestrian scramble (Barnes Dance), and only switch to a green light for motor vehicles from a particular approach (for a short time period) when it is actually actuated by a vehicle. Buses and emergency vehicles would still be able to get priority by signaling from upstream.

Shibuya, Japan (from wikimedia commons)
Shibuya, Japan (from wikimedia commons)

 

Today, in the United States, traffic signals are usually designed with the objective of minimizing motor vehicle delay, yet many policies and plans have a stated aim of reducing the amount of vehicle miles traveled or the automobile mode share. How does lowering the cost of driving and increasing the cost of every other mode help with that objective?

Now we place pedestrians in the supplicant position of begging for a green light. Let’s give walkers some dignity, and instead of making them “scramble” at the intersection, allow them to simply purposefully walk, or even amble. If instead of pedestrians waiting for cars, cars had to wait for pedestrians, vehicle delay would undoubtedly rise. But vehicle counts would fall, and pedestrian demand would rise. Where would the vehicles go, would they disappear or reroute?

Think about places this would work in your community. In the Twin Cities, I think this would be great for Dinkytown and Uptown.

It is a change, it would need to be tested somewhere before it could be done everywhere. There will always be resistance by the stalwarts. But we should experiment.

The measure of success would be change in pedestrian and bike counts, the reduction in vehicle counts (at this location), and maybe the change in sales at nearby businesses.

Cancelled Seminar: The Impact of Activities Conducted while Traveling on Mode Choice: An Investigation of Northern California Commuters

Special Seminar Friday, May 9, 2014 11:15am-12:15pm Room 1130, Mechanical Engineering Bldg University of Minnesota East Bank Campus The Impact of Activities Conducted while Traveling on Mode Choice: An Investigation of Northern California Commuters Patricia L. Mokhtarian, Professor School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

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